„Know that whatever conforms to reason, logic, and the advantages and needs of our people conforms equally to Islam.“

As quoted in Kemalizm, Laiklik ve Demokrasi [Kemalism, Laicism and Democracy] (1994) by Ahmet Taner Kışlalı
Contexte: Religion is an important institution. A nation without religion cannot survive. Yet it is also very important to note that religion is a link between Allah and the individual believer. The brokerage of the pious cannot be permitted. Those who use religion for their own benefit are detestable. We are against such a situation and will not allow it. Those who use religion in such a manner have fooled our people; it is against just such people that we have fought and will continue to fight. Know that whatever conforms to reason, logic, and the advantages and needs of our people conforms equally to Islam. If our religion did not conform to reason and logic, it would not be the perfect religion, the final religion.

Adopté de Wikiquote. Dernière mise à jour 23 juillet 2021. L'histoire
Mustafa Kemal Atatürk photo
Mustafa Kemal Atatürk17
fondateur et le premier président de la République turque 1881 - 1938

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„The gods conform scrupulously to the sentiments of their worshippers: they have reasons for so doing.“

—  Anatole France French writer 1844 - 1924

Source: The White Stone (1905), Ch. III, p. 135
Contexte: The gods conform scrupulously to the sentiments of their worshippers: they have reasons for so doing. Pay attention to this. The spirit which favoured the accession in Rome of the god of Israel was not merely the spirit of the masses, but also that of the philosophers. At that time, they were nearly all Stoics, and believed in one god alone, one on whose behalf Plato had laboured and one unconnected by tie of family or friendship with the gods of human form of Greece and Rome. This god, through his infinity, resembled the god of the Jews. Seneca and Epictetus, who venerated him, would have been the first to have been surprised at the resemblance, had they been called upon to institute a comparison. Nevertheless, they had themselves greatly contributed towards rendering acceptable the austere monotheism of the Judaeo-Christians. Doubtless a wide gulf separated Stoic haughtiness from Christian humility, but Seneca's morals, consequent upon his sadness and his contempt of nature, were paving the way for the Evangelical morals. The Stoics had joined issue with life and the beautiful; this rupture, attributed to Christianity, was initiated by the philosophers. A couple of centuries later, in the time of Constantine, both pagans and Christians will have, so to speak, the same morals and philosophy. The Emperor Julian, who restored to the Empire its old religion, which had been abolished by Constantine the Apostate, is justly regarded as an opponent of the Galilean. And, when perusing the petty treatises of Julian, one is struck with the number of ideas this enemy of the Christians held in common with them. He, like them, is a monotheist; with them, he believes in the merits of abstinence, fasting, and mortification of the flesh; with them, he despises carnal pleasures, and considers he will rise in favour with the gods by avoiding women; finally, he pushes Christian sentiment to the degree of rejoicing over his dirty beard and his black finger-nails. The Emperor Julian's morals were almost those of St. Gregory Nazianzen. There is nothing in this but what is natural and usual. The transformations undergone by morals and ideas are never sudden. The greatest changes in social life are wrought imperceptibly, and are only seen from afar. Christianity did not secure a foothold until such time as the condition of morals accommodated itself to it, and as Christianity itself had become adjusted to the condition of morals. It was unable to substitute itself for paganism until such time as paganism came to resemble it, and itself came to resemble paganism.

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„People Propose, Science Studies, Technology Conforms.“

—  Donald A. Norman American academic 1935

Things That Make Us Smart (1993), Epilogue.

Jacques Maritain photo
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„This is why the opposite of courage in our society is not cowardice, it's conformity.“

—  Rollo May US psychiatrist 1909 - 1994

As quoted in Think and Grow Rich : A Black Choice (1991) by Dennis Kimbro and Napoleon Hill, p. 104
Contexte: Many people feel they are powerless to do anything effective with their lives. It takes courage to break out of the settled mold, but most find conformity more comfortable. This is why the opposite of courage in our society is not cowardice, it's conformity.

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„I now know, by an almost fatalistic conformity with the facts, that my destiny is to travel…“

—  Ernesto Che Guevara Argentine Marxist revolutionary 1928 - 1967

Source: The Motorcycle Diaries: Notes on a Latin American Journey

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„Our dangers, as it seems to me, are not from the outrageous but from the conforming“

—  Learned Hand American legal scholar, Court of Appeals judge 1872 - 1961

"The Preservation of Personality" (2 June 1927).
Extra-judicial writings
Contexte: Our dangers, as it seems to me, are not from the outrageous but from the conforming; not from those who rarely and under the lurid glare of obloquy upset our moral complaisance, or shock us with unaccustomed conduct, but from those, the mass of us, who take their virtues and their tastes, like their shirts and their furniture, from the limited patterns which the market offers.

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„Never to conform to fashion from fear of eccentricity, never to be eccentric from fear of conformity.“

—  Steven Brust American fantasy and science fiction author 1955

Paths of the Dead (2002)
Contexte: To seek understanding before taking action, yet to trust my instincts when action is called for. Never to avoid danger from fear, never to seek out danger for its own sake. Never to conform to fashion from fear of eccentricity, never to be eccentric from fear of conformity.

Oscar Wilde photo

„Conformity is the last refuge of the unimaginitive“

—  Oscar Wilde, livre Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young

Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young (1894)
Variante: Ambition is the last refuge of the failure
Contexte: Ambition is the last refuge of the failure.

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„To conform is to lose your soul“

—  Joshua Ferris, Then We Came to the End

Source: Then We Came to the End

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„Knowledge is the conformity of the object and the intellect.“

—  Averroes Medieval Arab scholar and philosopher 1126 - 1198

Attributed to Averroes, in: John Bartlett (1968) Familiar Qutations. p. 155

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„Equality, rightly understood, as our founding fathers understood it, leads to liberty and to the emancipation of creative differences. Wrongly understood, as it has been so tragically in our time, it leads first to conformity and then to despotism.“

—  Barry Goldwater American politician 1909 - 1998

Acceptance Speech http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/politics/daily/may98/goldwaterspeech.htm as the Republican Presidential candidate, San Francisco (July 1964)
Unsourced variant: Now those who seek absolute power, even though they seek it to do what they regard as good, are simply demanding the right to enforce their own version of heaven on earth, and let me remind you they are the very ones who always create the most hellish tyranny.
Contexte: Those who seek absolute power, even though they seek it to do what they regard as good, are simply demanding the right to enforce their own version of heaven on earth. And let me remind you, they are the very ones who always create the most hellish tyrannies. Absolute power does corrupt, and those who seek it must be suspect and must be opposed. Their mistaken course stems from false notions of equality, ladies and gentlemen. Equality, rightly understood, as our founding fathers understood it, leads to liberty and to the emancipation of creative differences. Wrongly understood, as it has been so tragically in our time, it leads first to conformity and then to despotism.

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