„Neither machines, nor the commodities made by them, rise in real value, but all commodities made by machines fall, and fall in proportion to their durability.“

Source: The Principles of Political Economy and Taxation (1821) (Third Edition), Chapter I, Section V, On Value, p. 26

Adopté de Wikiquote. Dernière mise à jour 3 juin 2021. L'histoire
David Ricardo photo
David Ricardo
économiste et financier, théoricien du capitalisme libéral … 1772 - 1823

Citations similaires

Adam Smith photo

„Labour, therefore, is the real measure of the exchangeable value of all commodities“

—  Adam Smith Scottish moral philosopher and political economist 1723 - 1790

Source: The Wealth of Nations (1776), Book I, Chapter V.
Contexte: Every man is rich or poor according to the degree in which he can afford to enjoy the necessaries, conveniences, and amusements of human life. But after the division of labour has once thoroughly taken place, it is but a very small part of these with which a man's own labour can supply him. The far greater part of them he must derive from the labour of other people, and he must be rich or poor according to the quantity of that labour which he can command, or which he can afford to purchase. The value of any commodity, therefore, to the person who possesses it, and who means not to use or consume it himself, but to exchange it for other commodities, is equal to the quantity of labour which it enables him to purchase or command. Labour, therefore, is the real measure of the exchangeable value of all commodities.

Fred W. Friendly photo
William Carlos Williams photo
Richard Wright photo
Karl Marx photo

„Gold is now money with reference to all other commodities only because it was previously, with reference to them, a simple commodity.“

—  Karl Marx German philosopher, economist, sociologist, journalist and revolutionary socialist 1818 - 1883

Vol. I, Ch. 1, Section 3, pg. 81.
(Buch I) (1867)

David Ricardo photo
Bertil Ohlin photo

„The productive factors enter into the production of different commodities in very different proportions.“

—  Bertil Ohlin Swedish economist and politician 1899 - 1979

Source: Interregional and international trade. (1933), p. 30.

„Young people must break machines to learn how to use them; get another made!“

—  Henry Cavendish

when he was told that one of his valuable instruments was broken by a young man, as quoted in Biographical Memoir of Henry Cavendish, by Georges Cuvier, The Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal (1828), p. 222.

Wilhelm Reich photo

„The basic question, then is: What has made the animal, man, degenerate into a machine?“

—  Wilhelm Reich, livre The Mass Psychology of Fascism

Section 3 : Work Democracy versus Politics. The Natural Social Forces for the Mastery of the Emotional Plague
The Mass Psychology of Fascism (1933), Ch. 10 : Work Democracy
Contexte: MAN IS FUNDAMENTALLY AN ANIMAL. Animals, as distinct from man, are not machine-like, not sadistic; their societies, within the same species, are incomparably more peaceful than those of man. The basic question, then is: What has made the animal, man, degenerate into a machine?
When I say "animal," I do not mean anything bad, cruel or "base"; I am stating a biological fact. Man has developed the peculiar concept that he is not an animal at all, but, well — man; a creature which long since has shed that which is "bad," which is "animal." He demarcates himself in all possible ways from the bad animal and points, in proof of his "being better," to culture and civilization which distinguish him from the animal. He shows, in his whole behavior, his "theories of values," his moral philosophies, his "monkey trials" and such, that he does not want to be reminded of the fact that basically he is an animal, an animal, furthermore, which has much more in common with the "animal" than with that being which he asserts to be and dreams of being. The theory of the German Übermensch has this origin. Man shows by his maliciousness, his inability to live in peace with his kind, his wars, that what distinguishes him from the other animals is only his unbounded sadism and the mechanical trinity of the authoritarian concept of life, mechanistic science and the machine. If one looks at the results of civilization as they present themselves over long periods of time, one finds that these contentions of man are not only erroneous; more than that, they seem to be made expressly for the purpose of making man forget that he is an animal.

Rick Riordan photo
Woodrow Wilson photo

„Government is not a machine, but a living thing. It falls, not under the theory of the universe, but under the theory of organic life. It is accountable to Darwin, not to Newton.“

—  Woodrow Wilson American politician, 28th president of the United States (in office from 1913 to 1921) 1856 - 1924

Section II: “What Is Progress?”, p. 47
1910s, The New Freedom (1913)

Joris-Karl Huysmans photo
Karl Marx photo

„Every commodity is compelled to chose some other commodity for its equivalent.“

—  Karl Marx German philosopher, economist, sociologist, journalist and revolutionary socialist 1818 - 1883

Vol. I, Ch. 1, Section 3, pg. 65.
(Buch I) (1867)

Theodor W. Adorno photo
Christopher Marlowe photo

„The story of the rise, fall, and forgetting of the individual is the tale of the rise, fall, and repression of psychoanalysis.“

—  Russell Jacoby American historian 1945

Source: Social Amnesia: A Critique of Conformist Psychology from Adler to Laing (1975), p. 38

Robert M. Pirsig photo

„The real cycle you're working on is a cycle called yourself. The machine that appears to be "out there" and the person that appears to be "in here" are not two separate things. They grow toward Quality or fall away from Quality together.“

—  Robert M. Pirsig, livre Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

Source: Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (1974), Ch. 26
Source: Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

David Ricardo photo

„Possessing utility, commodities derive their exchangeable value from two sources: from their scarcity, and from the quantity of labour required to obtain them.“

—  David Ricardo British political economist, broker and politician 1772 - 1823

Source: The Principles of Political Economy and Taxation (1821) (Third Edition), Chapter I, Section I, On Value, p. 5

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