„The delight we inspire in others has this enchanting peculiarity that, far from being diminished like every other reflection, it returns to us more radiant than ever.“

Source: Les Misérables

Last update June 3, 2021. History
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Victor Hugo308
French poet, novelist, and dramatist 1802 - 1885

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John Reid, Baron Reid of Cardowan photo

„Leadership isn't a zero sum game. When one of us shines it doesn't diminish the others, it reflects on all of us.“

—  John Reid, Baron Reid of Cardowan British politician 1947

Speech to the Labour Party conference in Manchester, 28 September 2006. BBC News 28 September 2006 http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/5388112.stm

Desmond Tutu photo

„Whether Jews like it or not, they are a peculiar people. They can't ever hope to be judged by the same standards which are used for other people.“

—  Desmond Tutu South African churchman, politician, archbishop, Nobel Prize winner 1931

As quoted in http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Op-Ed-Contributors/Nobel-winners-problem-with-a-peculiar-people-and-Israel (June 2, 2012)

Joseph Lewis photo

„The Bible is not a divine revelation from God. It is not inspired; on the contrary, it is a wicked book …. It has been responsible for more suffering and torture than any other volume ever printed……“

—  Joseph Lewis American activist 1889 - 1968

Quoted from Talreja, K. M. (2000). Holy Vedas and holy Bible: A comparative study. New Delhi: Rashtriya Chetana Sangathan.

Lewis Gompertz photo

„I admit it as an axiom, that every animal has more right to the use of its own body than others have to use it.“

—  Lewis Gompertz Early animal rights activist 1783 - 1861

Quoted by Lawrence W. Baker in Animal Rights and Welfare: A Documentary and Reference Guide (2015), p. 38.

Robert G. Ingersoll photo

„Write the name of Charles Darwin on the one hand and the name of every theologian who ever lived on the other, and from that name has come more light to the world than from all of those.“

—  Robert G. Ingersoll Union United States Army officer 1833 - 1899

Orthodoxy (1884)
Context: This century will be called Darwin’s century. He was one of the greatest men who ever touched this globe. He has explained more of the phenomena of life than all of the religious teachers. Write the name of Charles Darwin on the one hand and the name of every theologian who ever lived on the other, and from that name has come more light to the world than from all of those.

Simone de Beauvoir photo

„The fact that we are human beings is infinitely more important than all the peculiarities that distinguish human beings from one another; it is never the given that confers superiorities: "virtue", as the ancients called it, is defined at the level of "that which depends on us."“

—  Simone de Beauvoir, book The Second Sex

In both sexes is played out the same drama of the flesh and the spirit, of finitude and transcendence; both are gnawed away by time and laid in wait for by death, they have the same essential need for one another; and they can gain from their liberty the same glory. If they were to taste it, they would no longer be tempted to dispute fallacious privileges, and fraternity between them could then come into existence.
The Second Sex (1949)

Mwanandeke Kindembo photo
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Franz Kafka photo

„None of us has ever seen a motive. Therefore, we don’t know we can’t do anything more than suspect what inspires the action of another. For this good and valid reason, we’re told not to judge.“

—  Brennan Manning writer, American Roman Catholic priest and United States Marine 1934 - 2013

Source: 2000s, The Wisdom of Tenderness: What happens when God's firece mercy transforms our lives (2002), p. 69

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Confucius photo

„Being in humaneness is good. If we select other goodness and thus are far apart from humaneness, how can we be the wise?“

—  Confucius Chinese teacher, editor, politician, and philosopher -551 - -479 BC

The opening phrase of this chapter after which the chapter is named in Chinese.
Original: (zh_Hant) 里仁為美、擇不處仁、焉得知。
Source: The Analects, Chapter IV

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Bob Black photo

„Every organization has more in common with every other organization than it does with any of the unorganized.“

—  Bob Black American anarchist 1951

Anarchism And Other Impediments To Anarchy (1985)
Context: Every organization has more in common with every other organization than it does with any of the unorganized. The anarchist critique of the state, if only the anarchists understood it, is but a special case of the critique of organization. And, at some level, even anarchist organizations sense this.
Anti-anarchists may well conclude that if there is to be hierarchy and coercion, let it be out in the open, clearly labeled as such. Unlike these pundits (the right-wing "libertarians", the minarchists, for instance) I stubbornly persist in my opposition to the state. But not because, as anarchists so often thoughtlessly declaim, the state is not "necessary". Ordinary people dismiss this anarchist assertion as ludicrous, and so they should. Obviously, in an industrialized class society like ours, the state is necessary. The point is that the state has created the conditions in which it is indeed necessary, by stripping individuals and face-to-face voluntary associations of their powers. More fundamentally, the state's underpinnings (work, moralism, industrial technology, hierarchic organizations) are not necessary but rather antithetical to the satisfactions of real needs and desires. Unfortunately, most brands of anarchism endorse all these premises yet balk at their logical conclusion: the state.
If there were no anarchists, the state would have had to invent them. We know that on several occasions it has done just that. We need anarchists unencumbered by anarchism. Then, and only then, we can begin to get serious about fomenting anarchy.

Tenzin Gyatso photo

„From the moment of birth every human being wants happiness and freedom and wants to avoid suffering. In this we are all the same; and the more we care for the happiness of others the greater our own sense of each other becomes.“

—  Tenzin Gyatso spiritual leader of Tibet 1935

Context: From the moment of birth every human being wants happiness and freedom and wants to avoid suffering. In this we are all the same; and the more we care for the happiness of others the greater our own sense of each other becomes. Many of our problems are created by ourselves based on divisions due to ideology, religion, race, resources, economic status or other factors. The time has come to think on a deeper, more human level and appreciate and respect our sameness as human beings. And to have a respect for endangered cultures that share these principles. We are at the dawn of an age in which many people feel that extreme political concepts should cease to dominate human affairs. We should use this opportunity to replace them with universal human and spiritual values and ensure that these values become the fiber of the global family that is emerging. It is not possible to find peace with anger, hatred, jealousy or greed. At every level of society, familial, tribal, national and international, the key to a happier and more peaceful and successful world is the growth of compassion. We do not necessarily need to become religious, nor even believe in an ideology. We need only to develop our good human qualities and know that love and compassion are the most essential concepts for human survival. So long as human beings live and suffer, the only world open to our present knowledge, the brotherhood of man will seem an unattainable principle. In order for us to achieve real lasting peace among one another, the effort to realize that noblest and most satisfactory moral value must be occupation of every individual intelligence.

The Compassionate Life (2001) Ch. 3 "Global Compassion".

Aurelius Augustinus photo

„For if a thing is not diminished by being shared with others, it is not rightly owned if it is only owned and not shared.“

—  Aurelius Augustinus, De doctrina christiana

1:1:1 English http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/jod/augustine/ddc1.html Latin http://www.sant-agostino.it/latino/dottrina_cristiana/index2.htm
Latin: Omnis enim res quae dando non deficit, dum habetur et non datur, nondum habetur quomodo habenda est.
De doctrina christiana

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