„Don't bear me ill will, speech, that I borrow weighty words,
then labor heavily so that they may seem light.“

"Under One Small Star"
Poems New and Collected (1998), Could Have (1972)
Context: I know I won't be justified as long as I live,
since I myself stand in my own way.
Don't bear me ill will, speech, that I borrow weighty words,
then labor heavily so that they may seem light.

Adopted from Wikiquote. Last update June 3, 2021. History
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Wisława Szymborska92
Polish writer 1923 - 2012

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