„Even more than in a poem, it is the aphorism that the word is god.“

Drawn and Quartered (1983)

Adopted from Wikiquote. Last update Feb. 11, 2021. History
Emil M. Cioran photo
Emil M. Cioran529
Romanian philosopher and essayist 1911 - 1995

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„For honesty is before honor; and though man must write his poems in sounding words, God's poems are printed best in the brave and silent duties of common life.“

—  Isabella Fyvie Mayo Scottish poet, novelist, reformer 1843 - 1914

Reported in Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895) by Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, p. 388.

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„Every word, every image used for God is a distortion more than a description.“

—  Anthony de Mello Indian writer 1931 - 1987

Comprehension
Source: One Minute Wisdom (1989)

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„For the Kabalist, the fact that God expresses Himself, even though His utterances are beyond any human insight, is more important than any specific and coded meaning His words can convey.“

—  Umberto Eco, book Semiotics and the Philosophy of Language

[4] Symbol, 4.4 : The symbolic mode, 4.4.4 : The Kabalistic drift
Semiotics and the Philosophy of Language (1984)
Context: Scholem … says that Jewish mystics have always tried to project their own thought into the biblical texts; as a matter of fact, every unexpressible reading of a symbolic machinery depends on such a projective attitude. In the reading of the Holy Text according to the symbolic mode, "letters and names are not conventional means of communication. They are far more. Each one of them represents a concentration of energy and expresses a wealth of meaning which cannot be translated, or not fully at least, into human language" [On the Kabbalah and Its Symbolism (1960); Eng. tr., p. 36]. For the Kabalist, the fact that God expresses Himself, even though His utterances are beyond any human insight, is more important than any specific and coded meaning His words can convey.
The Zohar says that "in any word shine a thousand lights" (3.202a). The unlimitedness of the sense of a text is due to the free combinations of its signifiers, which in that text are linked together as they are only accidentally but which could be combined differently.

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„We are all writing God's poem.“

—  Anne Sexton poet from the United States 1928 - 1974

As quoted by Erica Jong, in "Into the lion's den" in The Guardian (26 October 2000) http://www.guardian.co.uk/theguardian/2000/oct/26/features11.g2

Ernest Gellner photo

„People are even more reluctant to admit that man explains nothing, than they were to admit that God explains nothing.“

—  Ernest Gellner Czech anthropologist, philosopher and sociologist 1925 - 1995

Legitimation of Belief (1974), p. 99

Thomas Jefferson photo

„Question with boldness even the existence of a god; because, if there be one, he must more approve the homage of reason, than that of blindfolded fear.“

—  Thomas Jefferson 3rd President of the United States of America 1743 - 1826

Scan of the original page http://memory.loc.gov/master/mss/mtj/mtj1/007/0900/0961.jpg at The Library of Congress.
1780s, Letter to Peter Carr (1787)
Context: Your reason is now mature enough to examine this object [religion]. In the first place divest yourself of all bias in favour of novelty & singularity of opinion. Indulge them in any other subject rather than that of religion. It is too important, & the consequences of error may be too serious. On the other hand shake off all the fears & servile prejudices under which weak minds are servilely crouched. Fix reason firmly in her seat, and call to her tribunal every fact, every opinion. Question with boldness even the existence of a god; because, if there be one, he must more approve the homage of reason, than that of blindfolded fear.

Charles Baudelaire photo

„God is the only being who need not even exist in order to reign.Whatever is created by the spirit is more alive than matter.“

—  Charles Baudelaire French poet 1821 - 1867

<p>Dieu est le seul être qui, pour régner, n'ait même pas besoin d'exister.</p><p>Ce qui est créé par l’esprit est plus vivant que la matière.</p>
I http://fr.wikisource.org/wiki/Fus%C3%A9es#I
Journaux intimes (1864–1867; published 1887), Fusées (1867)

Iamblichus photo

„For us it is sufficient that this is the will of the Gods, which all enable us to undertake tasks even more arduous than these.“

—  Iamblichus Syrian philosopher 250 - 330

Source: Life of Pythagoras, Ch. 1 : Importance of the Subject
Context: Since wise people are in the habit of invoking the divinities at the beginning of any philosophic consideration, this is all the more necessary on studying that one which is justly named after the divine Pythagoras. Inasmuch as it emanated from the divinities it could not be apprehended without their inspiration and assistance. Besides, its beauty and majesty so surpasses human capacity, that it cannot be comprehended in one glance. Gradually only can some details of it be mastered when, under divine guidance we approach the subject with a quiet mind. Having therefore invoked the divine guidance, and adapted ourselves and our style to the divine circumstances, we shall acquiesce in all the suggestions that come to us. Therefore we shall not begin with any excuses for the long neglect of this sect, nor by any explanations about its having been concealed by foreign disciplines, or mystic symbols, nor insist that it has been obscured by false and spurious writings, nor make apologies for any special hindrances to its progress. For us it is sufficient that this is the will of the Gods, which all enable us to undertake tasks even more arduous than these. Having thus acknowledged our primary submission to the divinities, our secondary devotion shall be to the prince and father of this philosophy as a leader.

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„Poems are made by fools like me,
But only God can make a tree.“

—  Joyce Kilmer, Trees and Other Poems

"Trees" - This poem was first published in Poetry: A Magazine of Verse Vol. 2 (August 1913). The first two lines were first written down on the 2nd of February 1913.
Trees and Other Poems (1914)
Context: I think that I shall never see
A poem lovely as a tree.
A tree whose hungry mouth is prest
Against the earth's sweet flowing breast;
A tree that looks at God all day,
And lifts her leafy arms to pray;
A tree that may in Summer wear
A nest of robins in her hair;
Upon whose bosom snow has lain;
Who intimately lives with rain.
Poems are made by fools like me,
But only God can make a tree.

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