Alfred Tennyson idézet

Alfred Tennyson fénykép
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Alfred Tennyson

Születési dátum: 6. augusztus 1809
Halál dátuma: 6. október 1892
Más nevek: Lord Alfred Tennyson, Alfred Lord Tennyson

Alfred Tennyson az Egyesült Királyság koszorús költője és egyben Anglia egyik legnépszerűbb költője.

Költészetének túlnyomó része klasszikus mitológiai témákon nyugodott, bár híres költeménye az In Memoriam legjobb barátja és volt osztálytársa, a költő Arthur Hallam halálára íródott, aki Tennyson lánytestvérével volt eljegyezve, ám az esküvő előtt szívrohamot kapott és meghalt. A költő számos verset írt Artur királyról és a hozzá kapcsolódó legendákról. Az egyik leghíresebbet ezek közül Albert hercegnek ajánlotta, Viktória királynő férjének. Tennyson a drámaírással is megpróbálkozott, azonban darabjai még életében sem voltak túlzottan népszerűek. Wikipedia

Idézetek Alfred Tennyson

„There is no joy but calm!“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, The Lotos-Eaters

Choric Song, st. 2
The Lotos-Eaters (1832)

„I grow in worth, and wit, and sense,
Unboding critic-pen,
Or that eternal want of pence,
Which vexes public men“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson

" Will Waterproof's Lyrical Monologue http://whitewolf.newcastle.edu.au/words/authors/T/TennysonAlfred/verse/englishidyls/willwaterproof.html", st. 6 (1842)
Kontextus: I grow in worth, and wit, and sense,
Unboding critic-pen,
Or that eternal want of pence,
Which vexes public men,
Who hold their hands to all, and cry
For that which all deny them —
Who sweep the crossings, wet or dry,
And all the world go by them.

„Death is the end of life; ah, why
Should life all labour be?“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, The Lotos-Eaters

Choric Song, st. 4
The Lotos-Eaters (1832)
Kontextus: Death is the end of life; ah, why
Should life all labour be?
Let us alone. Time driveth onward fast,
And in a little while our lips are dumb.
Let us alone. What is it that will last?
All things are taken from us, and become
Portions and parcels of the dreadful past.
Let us alone. What pleasure can we have
To war with evil? Is there any peace
In ever climbing up the climbing wave?
All things have rest, and ripen toward the grave
In silence; ripen, fall and cease:
Give us long rest or death, dark death, or dreamful ease.

„Come, my friends.
'Tis not too late to seek a newer world.
Push off, and sitting well in order smite
The sounding furrows; for my purpose holds
To sail beyond the sunset, and the baths
Of all the western stars, until I die.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, könyv Ulysses

Forrás: Ulysses (1842), l. 54-62
Kontextus: The lights begin to twinkle from the rocks;
The long day wanes; the slow moon climbs; the deep
Moans round with many voices.
Come, my friends.
'Tis not too late to seek a newer world.
Push off, and sitting well in order smite
The sounding furrows; for my purpose holds
To sail beyond the sunset, and the baths
Of all the western stars, until I die.

„Love lieth deep; Love dwells not in lip-depths.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson

The Lover's Tale (1879), line 466

„Self-reverence, self-knowledge, self-control,
These three alone lead life to sovereign power.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Oenone

"Oenone", st. 14
Kontextus: Self-reverence, self-knowledge, self-control,
These three alone lead life to sovereign power.
Yet not for power (power of herself
Would come uncall'd for) but to live by law,
Acting the law we live by without fear;
And, because right is right, to follow right
Were wisdom in the scorn of consequence.

„Old age hath yet his honor and his toil.
Death closes all; but something ere the end,
Some work of noble note, may yet be done,
Not unbecoming men that strove with gods.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, könyv Ulysses

Forrás: Ulysses (1842), l. 46-53
Kontextus: Souls that have toil'd, and wrought, and thought with me —
That ever with a frolic welcome took
The thunder and the sunshine, and opposed
Free hearts, free foreheads — you and I are old;
Old age hath yet his honor and his toil.
Death closes all; but something ere the end,
Some work of noble note, may yet be done,
Not unbecoming men that strove with gods.

„The many fail: the one succeeds.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, The Day-Dream

The Arrival, st. 2
The Day-Dream (1842)
Kontextus: The bodies and the bones of those
That strove in other days to pass,
Are wither'd in the thorny close,
Or scatter'd blanching on the grass.
He gazes on the silent dead:
"They perish'd in their daring deeds."
This proverb flashes thro' his head,
"The many fail: the one succeeds."

„Thus truth was multiplied on truth“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Lady Clara Vere de Vere

The Poet (1830)
Kontextus: p>Thus truth was multiplied on truth, the world
Like one great garden show'd,
And thro' the wreaths of floating dark up-curl'd,
Rare sunrise flow'dAnd Freedom rear'd in that august sunrise
Her beautiful bold brow,
When rites and forms before his burning eyes
Melted like snow.</p

„But am I not the nobler thro' thy love?
O three times less unworthy! likewise thou
Art more thro' Love, and greater than thy years.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson

" Love and Duty http://www.readbookonline.net/read/4310/14259/", l. 1- 21 (1842)
Kontextus: Of love that never found his earthly close,
What sequel? Streaming eyes and breaking hearts?
Or all the same as if he had not been?
Not so. Shall Error in the round of time
Still father Truth? O shall the braggart shout
For some blind glimpse of freedom work itself
Thro' madness, hated by the wise, to law
System and empire? Sin itself be found
The cloudy porch oft opening on the Sun?
And only he, this wonder, dead, become
Mere highway dust? or year by year alone
Sit brooding in the ruins of a life,
Nightmare of youth, the spectre of himself!
If this were thus, if this, indeed, were all,
Better the narrow brain, the stony heart,
The staring eye glazed o'er with sapless days,
The long mechanic pacings to and fro,
The set gray life, and apathetic end.
But am I not the nobler thro' thy love?
O three times less unworthy! likewise thou
Art more thro' Love, and greater than thy years.

„Man comes and tills the field and lies beneath,
And after many a summer dies the swan.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson

" Tithonus http://home.att.net/%7ETennysonPoetry/tith.htm", st. 1 (1860)
Kontextus: The woods decay, the woods decay and fall,
The vapours weep their burthen to the ground,
Man comes and tills the field and lies beneath,
And after many a summer dies the swan.
Me only cruel immortality
Consumes: I wither slowly in thine arms,
Here at the quiet limit of the world,
A white-hair'd shadow roaming like a dream
The ever-silent spaces of the East,
Far-folded mists, and gleaming halls of morn.

„Of love that never found his earthly close,
What sequel?“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson

" Love and Duty http://www.readbookonline.net/read/4310/14259/", l. 1- 21 (1842)
Kontextus: Of love that never found his earthly close,
What sequel? Streaming eyes and breaking hearts?
Or all the same as if he had not been?
Not so. Shall Error in the round of time
Still father Truth? O shall the braggart shout
For some blind glimpse of freedom work itself
Thro' madness, hated by the wise, to law
System and empire? Sin itself be found
The cloudy porch oft opening on the Sun?
And only he, this wonder, dead, become
Mere highway dust? or year by year alone
Sit brooding in the ruins of a life,
Nightmare of youth, the spectre of himself!
If this were thus, if this, indeed, were all,
Better the narrow brain, the stony heart,
The staring eye glazed o'er with sapless days,
The long mechanic pacings to and fro,
The set gray life, and apathetic end.
But am I not the nobler thro' thy love?
O three times less unworthy! likewise thou
Art more thro' Love, and greater than thy years.

„O young Mariner,
You from the haven
Under the sea-cliff,
You that are watching
The gray Magician
With eyes of wonder,
I am Merlin,
And I am dying,
I am Merlin
Who follow The Gleam.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson

" Merlin and the Gleam http://whitewolf.newcastle.edu.au/words/authors/T/TennysonAlfred/verse/demeter/merlingleam.html", st. 1 (1889)

„And in her raiment's hem was traced in flame
WISDOM, a name to shake
All evil dreams of power — a sacred name.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Lady Clara Vere de Vere

The Poet (1830)
Kontextus: There was no blood upon her maiden robes
Sunn'd by those orient skies;
But round about the circles of the globes
Of her keen
And in her raiment's hem was traced in flame
WISDOM, a name to shake
All evil dreams of power — a sacred name.
And when she spake,
Her words did gather thunder as they ran,
And as the lightning to the thunder
Which follows it, riving the spirit of man,
Making earth wonder,
So was their meaning to her words. No sword
Of wrath her right arm whirl'd,
But one poor poet's scroll, and with his word
She shook the world.

„Little flower — but if I could understand
What you are, root and all, and all in all,
I should know what God and man is.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson

"Flower in the Crannied Wall" (1869)
Kontextus: Flower in the crannied wall,
I pluck you out of the crannies,
I hold you here, root and all, in my hand,
Little flower — but if I could understand
What you are, root and all, and all in all,
I should know what God and man is.

„Theirs not to make reply,
Theirs not to reason why,
Theirs but to do and die:
Into the valley of death
Rode the six hundred.“

—  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, The Charge of the Light Brigade

St. 2
The Charge of the Light Brigade (1854)
Kontextus: "Forward, the Light Brigade!"
Was there a man dismay'd?
Not tho' the soldier knew
Some one had blunder'd:
Theirs not to make reply,
Theirs not to reason why,
Theirs but to do and die:
Into the valley of death
Rode the six hundred.

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