„The division of labour is a consequence of the previous accumulation of capital… As the accumulation of capital must have preceded the division of labour, so its subsequent division can only be extended as capital is more and more accumulated. Accumulation and division act and react on each other. The quantity of raw materials which the same number of people can work up increases in a great proportion, as labour comes to be more and more subdivided; and acccording as the operations of each workman are reduced to a greater degree of identity and simplicity, he has, as already explained, a greater chance of discovering machines and processes for facilitating and abridging his labour. The quantity of industry, therefore, not only increases in every country with the increase of the stock or capital which sets it in motion; but, in consequence of this increase, the division of labour becomes extended, new and more powerful implements and machines are invented, and the same quantity of labour is thus made to produce an infinitely greater quantity of commodities“

Source: The principles of political economy, 1825, p. 95-96

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Source: Notebook IV, The Chapter on Capital, p. 308.

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„As the chosen people bore in their features the sign manual of Jehovah, so the division of labour brands the manufacturing workman as the property of capital.“

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„Caste is not just a division of labour, it is a division of labourers.“

—  Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar Father of republic India, champion of human rights, father of India's Constitution, polymath, revolutionary, social ref… 1891 - 1956

As quoted in The Annihilation of Caste http://ccnmtl.columbia.edu/projects/mmt/ambedkar/web/section_4.html

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—  Jean-Baptiste Say French economist and businessman 1767 - 1832

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„In reality, the labourer belongs to capital before he has sold himself to capital.“

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„Inflation is always and everywhere a monetary phenomenon in the sense that it is and can be produced only by a more rapid increase in the quantity of money than in output.“

—  Milton Friedman American economist, statistician, and writer 1912 - 2006

The Counter-Revolution in Monetary Theory (1970) <!-- ([[w:Institute of Economic Affairs
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„The development of fixed capital indicates in still another respect the degree of development of wealth generally, or of capital…
The creation of a large quantity of disposable time apart from necessary labour time for society generally and each of its members (i.e. room for the development of the individuals’ full productive forces, hence those of society also), this creation of not-labour time appears in the stage of capital, as of all earlier ones, as not-labour time, free time, for a few. What capital adds is that it increases the surplus labour time of the mass by all the means of art and science, because its wealth consists directly in the appropriation of surplus labour time; since value directly its purpose, not use value. It is thus, despite itself, instrumental in creating the means of social disposable time, in order to reduce labour time for the whole society to a diminishing minimum, and thus to free everyone’s time for their own development. But its tendency always, on the one side, to create disposable time, on the other, to convert it into surplus labour...
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