„Lewis has written that "man makes history." Althusser unleashes a pamphlet at him maintaining that such is not the case: "Ce sont les masses qui font I'histoire." I challenge anyone to find a social scientist outside the Marxist camp who can seriously pose a problem of this type.“

Source: Telos Nr. 35-38, (1978), p. 11

Adopté de Wikiquote. Dernière mise à jour 3 juin 2021. L'histoire
Norberto Bobbio photo
Norberto Bobbio
1909 - 2004

Citations similaires

Olly Blackburn photo

„Dawn of the Dead is one of the most prophetic and disturbing films you’ll see, and I challenge you to find anyone who can find another film from that era which provides the same level of social commentary.“

—  Olly Blackburn Film director and screenwriter

[The Skinny, Scotland, http://www.theskinny.co.uk/film/features/44237-director_olly_blackburn_talks_donkey_punch, Radge Media, 10 November 2008, 23 February 2012, Director Olly Blackburn talks Donkey Punch, Michael, Gillespie]

Oscar Wilde photo
African Spir photo
Robert Spencer photo
Marshall McLuhan photo

„The typographic logic created “the outsider,” the alienated mass, as the type of integral, that is, intuitive and irrational, man.“

—  Marshall McLuhan Canadian educator, philosopher, and scholar-- a professor of English literature, a literary critic, and a communicatio… 1911 - 1980

Source: 1960s, The Gutenberg Galaxy (1962), p. 241

Raymond Chandler photo
Frank Lloyd Wright photo

„The scientist has marched in and taken the place of the poet. But one day somebody will find the solution to the problems of the world and remember, it will be a poet, not a scientist.“

—  Frank Lloyd Wright American architect (1867-1959) 1867 - 1959

As quoted in The Star (1959) and Morrow's International Dictionary of Contemporary Quotations (1982) by Jonathon Green.

Max Planck photo
Maria Montessori photo

„We give the name scientist to the type of man who has felt experiment to be a means guiding him to search out the deep truth of life, to lift a veil from its fascinating secrets, and who, in this pursuit, has felt arising within him a love for the mysteries of nature, so passionate as to annihilate the thought of himself.“

—  Maria Montessori Italian pedagogue, philosopher and physician 1870 - 1952

Source: The Montessori Method (1912), Ch. 1 : A Critical Consideration of the New Pedagogy in its Relation to Modern Science, p. 8.
Contexte: We give the name scientist to the type of man who has felt experiment to be a means guiding him to search out the deep truth of life, to lift a veil from its fascinating secrets, and who, in this pursuit, has felt arising within him a love for the mysteries of nature, so passionate as to annihilate the thought of himself. The scientist is not the clever manipulator of instruments, he is the worshipper of nature and he bears the external symbols of his passion as does the follower of some religious order. To this body of real scientists belong those who, forgetting, like the Trappists of the Middle Ages, the world about them, live only in the laboratory, careless often in matters of food and dress because they no longer think of themselves; those who, through years of unwearied use of the microscope, become blind; those who in their scientific ardour inoculate themselves with tuberculosis germs; those who handle the excrement of cholera patients in their eagerness to learn the vehicle through which the diseases are transmitted; and those who, knowing that a certain chemical preparation may be an explosive, still persist in testing their theories at the risk of their lives. This is the spirit of the men of science, to whom nature freely reveals her secrets, crowning their labours with the glory of discovery.
There exists, then, the "spirit" of the scientist, a thing far above his mere "mechanical skill," and the scientist is at the height of his achievement when the spirit has triumphed over the mechanism. When he has reached this point, science will receive from him not only new revelations of nature, but philosophic syntheses of pure thought.

Dexter S. Kimball photo
Craig Ferguson photo
Rick Riordan photo

„A hero can go anywhere, challenge anyone, as long as he has the nerve.“

—  Rick Riordan American writer 1964

Source: Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Ultimate Guide

Rachel Kushner photo
Herman Kahn photo
Angela Merkel photo

„History has often showed us the strength of the forces that are unleashed by the yearning for freedom.“

—  Angela Merkel Chancellor of Germany 1954

Remarks by President Obama and Chancellor Merkel in an Exchange of Toasts on June 07, 2011. http://www.newsroomamerica.com/story/137358/remarks_by_president_obama_and_chancellor_merkel_in_an_exchange_of_toasts.html
Contexte: History has often showed us the strength of the forces that are unleashed by the yearning for freedom. It moved people to overcome their fears and openly confront dictators such as in about 22 years ago. […] The yearning for freedom cannot be contained by walls for long. It was this yearning that brought down the Iron Curtain that divided Germany and Europe, and indeed the world, into two blocs.

Václav Havel photo
Arthur Conan Doyle photo
Theodore von Kármán photo
Cassandra Clare photo

Avec