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John Donne

Data urodzenia: 1572
Data zgonu: 31. Marzec 1631

John Donne – czołowy poeta wczesnego angielskiego baroku, główny przedstawiciel nurtu poezji metafizycznej. Wikipedia

Fotografia: Unknown author / Public domain

„Żaden człowiek nie jest samoistną wyspą; każdy stanowi ułomek kontynentu, część lądu. Jeżeli morze zmyje choćby grudkę ziemi, Europa będzie pomniejszona, tak samo jak gdyby pochłonęło przylądek, włość twoich przyjaciół czy twoją własną. Śmierć każdego człowieka umniejsza mnie, albowiem jestem zespolony z ludzkością. Przeto nigdy nie pytaj, komu bije dzwon: bije on tobie.“

—  John Donne

No man is an Island, intire of it selfe; every man is a peece of the Continent, a part of the maine; if a Clod bee washed away by the Sea, Europe is the lesse, as well as if a Promontorie were, as well as if a Mannor of thy friends or of thine own were; any mans death diminishes me, because I am involved in Mankinde; And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee. (ang.)
fragment wykorzystany przez Hemingwaya w powieści Komu bije dzwon.
Źródło: Medytacja XVII

„No spring, nor summer beauty hath such grace,
As I have seen in one autumnal face.“

—  John Donne

No. 9, The Autumnal, line 1
Elegies
Źródło: The Complete Poetry and Selected Prose

„Be thine own palace, or the world's thy jail.“

—  John Donne

Źródło: The Poems of John Donne; Miscellaneous Poems (Songs and Sonnets) Elegies. Epithalamions, or Marriage Songs. Satires. Epigrams. the Progress of

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„I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved?“

—  John Donne, The Good-Morrow

Songs and Sonnets (1633), The Good-Morrow
Kontekst: p>I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then?
But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den?
’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.
If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls,
Which watch not one another out of fear;
For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.
Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,
Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown,
Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,
And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;
Where can we find two better hemispheres,
Without sharp north, without declining west?
Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;
If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.</p

„If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.“

—  John Donne, The Good-Morrow

Songs and Sonnets (1633), The Good-Morrow
Kontekst: p>I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then?
But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den?
’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.
If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls,
Which watch not one another out of fear;
For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.
Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,
Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown,
Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,
And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;
Where can we find two better hemispheres,
Without sharp north, without declining west?
Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;
If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.</p

„If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee.“

—  John Donne, The Good-Morrow

Songs and Sonnets (1633), The Good-Morrow
Kontekst: p>I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then?
But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den?
’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.
If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls,
Which watch not one another out of fear;
For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.
Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,
Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown,
Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,
And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;
Where can we find two better hemispheres,
Without sharp north, without declining west?
Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;
If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.</p

„They'are ours, though they'are not we“

—  John Donne

The Extasy, line 45
Kontekst: We then, who are this new soul, know
Of what we are compos'd and made,
For th' atomies of which we grow
Are souls, whom no change can invade.
But oh alas, so long, so far,
Our bodies why do we forbear?
They'are ours, though they'are not we; we are
The intelligences, they the spheres.

„Death, be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so,“

—  John Donne, książka Holy Sonnets

No. 10, line 1
Holy Sonnets (1633)
Kontekst: Death, be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so,
For those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow,
Die not, poor death, nor yet canst thou kill me.

„At the round earth's imagin'd corners, blow
Your trumpets, angels, and arise, arise“

—  John Donne, książka Holy Sonnets

No. 7, line 1
Holy Sonnets (1633)
Kontekst: At the round earth's imagin'd corners, blow
Your trumpets, angels, and arise, arise
From death, you numberless infinities
Of souls, and to your scattred bodies go.

„For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.“

—  John Donne, The Good-Morrow

Songs and Sonnets (1633), The Good-Morrow
Kontekst: p>I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then?
But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den?
’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.
If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls,
Which watch not one another out of fear;
For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.
Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,
Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown,
Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,
And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;
Where can we find two better hemispheres,
Without sharp north, without declining west?
Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;
If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.</p

„Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.“

—  John Donne, The Good-Morrow

Songs and Sonnets (1633), The Good-Morrow
Kontekst: p>I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then?
But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den?
’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.
If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee. And now good-morrow to our waking souls,
Which watch not one another out of fear;
For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.
Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,
Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown,
Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,
And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;
Where can we find two better hemispheres,
Without sharp north, without declining west?
Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;
If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.</p

„Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Etiam egestas wisi a erat. Morbi imperdiet, mauris ac auctor dictum.“

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