„Gay love, God save it, so soone hotte, so soone colde.“

—  Nicholas Udall, Ralph Roister Doister

Christian Custance, Act IV, sc. viii.
Ralph Roister Doister (c. 1553)

Forrás Wikiquote. Utolsó frissítés 2021. június 3.. Történelem
Nicholas Udall fénykép
Nicholas Udall7
English playwright 1505 - 1556

Hasonló idézetek

Thomas Malory fénykép

„Right so fareth love nowadays, soon hot soon cold: this is no stability. But the old love was not so.“

—  Thomas Malory, könyv Le Morte d'Arthur

Book XVIII, ch. 25
Le Morte d'Arthur (c. 1469) (first known edition 1485)
Kontextus: Nowadays men cannot love seven night but they must have all their desires: that love may not endure by reason; for where they be soon accorded and hasty, heat soon it cooleth. Right so fareth love nowadays, soon hot soon cold: this is no stability. But the old love was not so.

John Heywood fénykép

„And ones their hastie heate a littell controlde,
Than perceiue they well, hotte love soone colde.
And whan hasty witlesse mirth is mated weele,
Good to be mery and wise, they thinke and feele.“

—  John Heywood English writer known for plays, poems and a collection of proverbs 1497 - 1580

Proverbs (1546)
Változat: And ones their hastie heate a littell controlde,
Than perceiue they well, hotte love soone colde.
And whan hasty witlesse mirth is mated weele,
Good to be mery and wise, they thinke and feele.

Jean Rhys fénykép
Tom Lehrer fénykép
Albert Barnes fénykép
Plutarch fénykép
Mitch Albom fénykép
H.L. Mencken fénykép
Kenesaw Mountain Landis fénykép

„Why should God wish to take a thoroughbred like Matty so soon, and leave some others down here that could well be spared?“

—  Kenesaw Mountain Landis American judge and baseball commissioner 1866 - 1944

Lamenting on the death of the famously virtuous former N.Y. Giants pitcher Christy Mathewson in 1925. Quoted in Christopher Hodge Evans, William R. Herzog, <i>The Faith of Fifty Million: Baseball, Religion, and American Culture</i> (Westminster John Knox Press, 2002, ISBN 0664223052), p. 77. http://books.google.com/books?id=nfk_O47SFGwC&pg=PA77&dq=%22like+Matty+so+soon

Herman Melville fénykép

„As soon as you say Me, a God, a Nature, so soon you jump off from your stool and hang from the beam. Yes, that word is the hangman. Take God out of the dictionary, and you would have Him in the street.“

—  Herman Melville American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and poet 1818 - 1891

Letter to Nathaniel Hawthorne, including bits of a review of his work that he had written (c. 16 April 1851); published in Nathaniel Hawthorne and His WIfe Vol, I (1884) by Julian Hawthorne, Ch. VIII : Lenox, p. 388
Kontextus: There is a certain tragic phase of humanity which, in our opinion, was never more powerfully embodied than by Hawthorne. We mean the tragedies of human thought in its own unbiassed, native, and profounder workings. We think that into no recorded mind has the intense feeling of the usable truth ever entered more deeply than into this man's. By usable truth, we mean the apprehension of the absolute condition of present things as they strike the eye of the man who fears them not, though they do their worst to him, — the man who, like Russia or the British Empire, declares himself a sovereign nature (in himself) amid the powers of heaven, hell, and earth. He may perish; but so long as he exists he insists upon treating with all Powers upon an equal basis. If any of those other Powers choose to withhold certain secrets, let them; that does not impair my sovereignty in myself; that does not make me tributary. And perhaps, after all, there is no secret. We incline to think that the Problem of the Universe is like the Freemason's mighty secret, so terrible to all children. It turns out, at last, to consist in a triangle, a mallet, and an apron, — nothing more! We incline to think that God cannot explain His own secrets, and that He would like a little information upon certain points Himself. We mortals astonish Him as much as He us. But it is this Being of the matter; there lies the knot with which we choke ourselves. As soon as you say Me, a God, a Nature, so soon you jump off from your stool and hang from the beam. Yes, that word is the hangman. Take God out of the dictionary, and you would have Him in the street.
There is the grand truth about Nathaniel Hawthorne. He says NO! in thunder; but the Devil himself cannot make him say yes. For all men who say yes, lie; and all men who say no,—why, they are in the happy condition of judicious, unincumbered travellers in Europe; they cross the frontiers into Eternity with nothing but a carpet-bag, — that is to say, the Ego. Whereas those yes-gentry, they travel with heaps of baggage, and, damn them! they will never get through the Custom House. What's the reason, Mr. Hawthorne, that in the last stages of metaphysics a fellow always falls to swearing so? I could rip an hour.

Naomi Novik fénykép
François de La Rochefoucauld fénykép

„Neither love nor fire can subsist without perpetual motion; both cease to live so soon as they cease to hope, or to fear.“

—  François de La Rochefoucauld, könyv Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims

L'amour aussi bien que le feu ne peut subsister sans un mouvement continuel; et il cesse de vivre dès qu'il cesse d'espérer ou de craindre.
Maxim 75.
Reflections; or Sentences and Moral Maxims (1665–1678)

„Gather leaves and grasses,
Love, to-day;
For the Autumn passes
Soon away.
Chilling winds are blowing.
It will soon be snowing.“

—  John Henry Boner American writer 1845 - 1903

Gather Leaves and Grasses, reported in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).

John of St. Samson fénykép

„Aspiration, practiced as a familiar, respectful and loving conversation with God, is such an excellent method, that, by means of it, one soon arrives at the summit of all perfection, and falls in love with Love.“

—  John of St. Samson 1571 - 1636

From The Goad, the Flames, the Arrows and the Mirror of the love of God
Változat: Aspiration, practiced as a familiar, respectful and loving conversation with God, is such an excellent method, that, by means of it, one soon arrives at the summit of all perfection, and falls in love with Love.

Charles Baudelaire fénykép

„Soon we will plunge into the cold darkness;
Farewell, vivid brightness of our too-short summers!“

—  Charles Baudelaire, könyv Les Fleurs du mal

Bientôt nous plongerons dans les froides ténèbres;
Adieu, vive clarté de nos étés trop courts!
"Chant d'Automne" [Song of Autumn] http://fr.wikisource.org/wiki/Chant_d%E2%80%99automne
Les fleurs du mal (Flowers of Evil) (1857)

John Donne fénykép

„Love built on beauty, soon as beauty, dies.“

—  John Donne English poet 1572 - 1631

No. 2, The Anagram, line 27
Elegies
Forrás: The Complete English Poems

Letitia Elizabeth Landon fénykép

„The excesses of love soon pass, but its insufficiencies torment us forever.“

—  Mignon McLaughlin American journalist 1913 - 1983

The Complete Neurotic's Notebook (1981), Love

Charles Bukowski fénykép

„and love is a word used
too much and
much
too soon.“

—  Charles Bukowski American writer 1920 - 1994

Forrás: The Night Torn Mad With Footsteps

Wisława Szymborska fénykép

Kapcsolódó témák